THE RUSSIAN TRAGEDY

£1.50

THESE PAMPHLETS, ISSUED HERE in book form for the ?rst time (The Russian Tragedy, The Russian Revolution and the Communist Party, The Kronstadt Rebellion), are Alexander Berkman’s ?rst writings after leaving Russia in December of 1921. He had entered Russia just two years earlier, ?lled with devotion to the ideals of the Russian revolution and anxious to contribute his share to the revolutionary process. It was a return home for him, as he had lived his ?rst 17 years in Russia and had grown up among the revolutionaries of that era. Now he was welcomed back as an important revolutionary exile from his adopted United States. Alexander Berkman, Emma Goldman, and 247 other “politicals” had been deported from the United States on December 21, 1919. Berkman and Goldman, the two most active anarchists in America since the turn of the century, had only recently each completed two year prison sentences for active opposition to the World War I draft (as founders and organisers of the No-Conscription League) and, though resentful of being so abruptly forced to terminate their organising in America, looked forward to enthusiastic participation in the revolutionary experiment in their native land, Russia.

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Description

THESE PAMPHLETS, ISSUED HERE in book form for the ?rst time (The Russian Tragedy, The Russian Revolution and the Communist Party, The Kronstadt Rebellion), are Alexander Berkman’s ?rst writings after leaving Russia in December of 1921. He had entered Russia just two years earlier, ?lled with devotion to the ideals of the Russian revolution and anxious to contribute his share to the revolutionary process. It was a return home for him, as he had lived his ?rst 17 years in Russia and had grown up among the revolutionaries of that era. Now he was welcomed back as an important revolutionary exile from his adopted United States. Alexander Berkman, Emma Goldman, and 247 other “politicals” had been deported from the United States on December 21, 1919. Berkman and Goldman, the two most active anarchists in America since the turn of the century, had only recently each completed two year prison sentences for active opposition to the World War I draft (as founders and organisers of the No-Conscription League) and, though resentful of being so abruptly forced to terminate their organising in America, looked forward to enthusiastic participation in the revolutionary experiment in their native land, Russia.