THE ROUSING OF THE SCOTTISH WORKING CLASS 1774-2008 With an appendix on Marxism and the Scottish National Question by James D. Young

£1.50

“ … The message of his book is that the rousing of the Scottish working class must wait until the rousing of Scotland itself. It may be that this is now beginning to happen. Unlike the early 1920s, when British capitalism could stumble through the depression on the back of its huge colonial Empire, the contemporary crisis is no longer a paying proposition for Scotland.”

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James D. Young’s book The Rousing of the Scottish Working Class, is an intelligent and extremely interesting enquiry into the consequences of this paradox [how a nation with a ‘well-defined identity and culture’ was subordinated to England by the Act of the Union of 1707] for the working class. As he so convincingly demonstrates, Scottish working-class history cannot be understood apart from the subordination of that country to English dominance. This domination was handled through a peculiarly English mechanism of suzerainty, whereby Scottish institutions (such as the distinctive educational and legal systems) were retained intact for obeisance to anglicised culture and most crucially, a participation in the fruits of English economic and cultural progress. This bargain, struck between the metropolitan and provincial elites was made before industrialisation, and the nature of Scottish nationalism has struggled ever since under that historic compromise…

“ … The message of his book is that the rousing of the Scottish working class must wait until the rousing of Scotland itself. It may be that this is now beginning to happen. Unlike the early 1920s, when British capitalism could stumble through the depression on the back of its huge colonial Empire, the contemporary crisis is no longer a paying proposition for Scotland.”

— Richard Price, International Labour and Working-Class History, 1980