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BA JIN On Anarchism and Terrorism

£1.50

A collection of essays by and on Ba Jin (1904-2005) one of the main figures of twentieth century Chinese literature, a survivor of the Chinese anarchist movement that disappeared with the Communist victory. While he was required to ‘repent’, and purged and humiliated during the Cultural Revolution, he never embraced any other ideal. Economically comfortable but personally stifling, he described his patriarchal family home as a despotic kingdom. His first escape came in 1919 when, under the influence of Kropotkin’s Appeal to the Young and the writings of Emma Goldman, he joined the local anarchist group, the Equality Society, becoming the group’s most active member, taking part in the students’ demonstrations against the local warlords, distributing revolutionary leaflets, and organizing a reading room on the premises of the local anarchist journal, to which he began to contribute articles.’He was also inspired by the stories of nineteenth-century Russian radicals who went ‘to the people’ as recounted by writers like Turgenev, whose works he would later translate. …

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Description

A collection of essays by and on Ba Jin (1904-2005) one of the main figures of twentieth century Chinese literature, a survivor of the Chinese anarchist movement that disappeared with the Communist victory. While he was required to ‘repent’, and purged and humiliated during the Cultural Revolution, he never embraced any other ideal. Economically comfortable but personally stifling, he described his patriarchal family home as a despotic kingdom. His first escape came in 1919 when, under the influence of Kropotkin’s Appeal to the Young and the writings of Emma Goldman, he joined the local anarchist group, the Equality Society, becoming the group’s most active member, taking part in the students’ demonstrations against the local warlords, distributing revolutionary leaflets, and organizing a reading room on the premises of the local anarchist journal, to which he began to contribute articles.’He was also inspired by the stories of nineteenth-century Russian radicals who went ‘to the people’ as recounted by writers like Turgenev, whose works he would later translate. …